Future Green Studio

News - June 2017

Displaying 6 news items from June 2017

  • Jun
  • 30

525 WEST 52ND STREET FEAT. IN FORBES, "12 SPECTACULAR GARDEN WALLS AND ATRIUMS WORTH CONTEMPLATING"

Future Green Studio's 525 West 52nd Street project is featured in Forbes article, "12 Spectacular Garden Walls and Atriums Worth Contemplating." Featuring some of the best green urban landscape architecture:

"Mesmerizing green gardens are usurping contemporary art - gaining popularity as an urban agriculture design aesthetic, breathing life into homes, condos, indoor work spaces...Here are 12 feel-good green garden installations and atriums - the new art form"

  • Jun
  • 26

"INSIDE FUTURE GREEN STUDIO'S JAPANESE-INSPIRED 'PREHISTORIC' GARDEN," IN THE CULTURE TRIP

525 West 52nd Street featured in The Culture Trip:

"Future Green Studio created a green atrium for this Manhattan residential building that extends nearly three floors, and features a green wall and viewing garden inspired by Japanese Tsubo-Niwa gardens."

  • Jun
  • 20

FUTURE GREEN'S PROJECT FEATURED IN THE ART & DESIGN SECTION OF THE NEW YORK TIMES, "Rooftop Terrace at Brooklyn Children’s Museum Is Set to Open"

The article announcing the opening and completion of the first phase of the Brooklyn Children Museum's Rooftop Garden. Future Green Studio designed and built the Native Woodland Garden, described by the museum's president, Stephanie Hill Wilchfort, as '"a gateway to nature."'

  • Jun
  • 19

TWO FUTURE GREEN PROJECTS WIN THE 2017 SARA NY AWARDS, INCLUDING PROJECT OF THE YEAR!

The Society of American Registered Architects - New York Council awarded the 2017 Special Award for Project of the Year to 520 West 28th Street. Future Green is excited to celebrate the collaboration with awardees Zaha Hadid Architects and Ismael Leyva Architects on the creation of an exterior garden, sculptural green wall that spans the length of the courtyard and it folds to become a platform bench, paving, stairs, and bench perimeter wall. Cast stone ribbons undulate to form pockets with highly textured plantings of vivid greens, as if they are spontaneously growing out of a rock face. Plants such as Mahonia japonica and Euphorbia amygdaloides are included in the garden palette; their unique character is in keeping with the unprecedented quality of the building. With careful articulation of the transitions between the vertical and horizontal plane with a singular material, the garden provides a seamless flexible space for daytime lounging or parties for residents and their guests that spill out from the events space at the High Line terrace.

Residence 1 is a remarkable four-bedroom home that sprawls out over 5,300 square feet of interior space with over 3,000 square feet of private terrace and two balconies with south, west and east exposures. The private terrace at nearly 3,000 square feet is south facing with a pool, outdoor kitchen and landscape garden. The upper level building setbacks host terraces and balconies with exemplary views. All feature outdoor kitchens and flexible spaces for dining, entertaining and sunbathing or lounging. Grade transitions from the 16th to 17th levels and the 22nd to 23rd levels include expanses of green roof and geometric expressions of the façade in the landscape. Plantings in these transitions offer a rich array of blue-green, gray and violet that complements the cool color of the steel façade

Additionally, Blue School Middle School and PellOverton Architects won a 2017 SARA Design Award. Future Green transformed the rooftop with vegetable gardens, native planting zones, a play area, and outdoor classroom space.

  • Jun
  • 01

FUTURE GREEN'S ERI YAMAGATA AND NANCY SEATON IN THE CUNY LANDSCAPE JOURNAL, PLOT : VOLUME 6

Future Green designers contributed to the "Cloud" Volume 6 of Plot, a publication edited by the second-year MLA students in the Graduate Landscape Architecture Program of the Bernard & Anne Spitzer School of Architecture at the City College of New York. The essay, "Fleeting Weeds," discusses the role of Spontaneous Urban Plants and their tendency to create cloud-like formations in the urban environment.